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Humber one of three organisations in country whose community mental health services are 'performing better than expected compared to other trusts'

Humber one of three organisations in country whose community mental health services are 'performing better than expected compared to other trusts'
24 November 2017

Humber NHS Foundation Trust is one of only three organisations in the country whose community mental health services are “performing ‘better than expected’ compared to other trusts”, inspectors have revealed. 

The Care Quality Commission (CQC) said the Trust’s results in the 2017 Community Mental Health Survey were down to “a higher proportion of patients responding positively about the care they received”. 

Scored out of 10 for each question, the Trust achieved nine for organising care, 8.1 for reviewing it, and 7.5 for treatments. 

On 11 further measures, it scored 9.9 for giving patients contact with the person in charge of their care; 8.5 for telling patients who was in charge of their care; and 8.5 for organising treatment. 

The Trust was rated ‘better’ than its counterparts for four of these measures and ‘about the same’ for seven. 

In a letter to its Chief Executive, Michele Moran, the CQC’s Deputy Chief Inspector and Lead for Mental Health, Dr Paul Lelliott, said: “Patients at your trust gave the most positive answers to questions, across the whole survey, more frequently than the England average. 

“I would like to take this opportunity to congratulate you and your staff team on this positive endorsement by the people who use your services.” 

Mr Lelliott added that he would share the “positive findings from your survey results” with NHS Improvement, the health service’s financial regulator. 

Ms Moran said Dr Lelliott’s letter was “good news” for Humber and “further evidence of its improvement”. 

The Chief Executive said: “For patients to rate our community mental health services so highly is a positive endorsement of the Trust and our hard-working and dedicated staff. 

“We will all celebrate this solid set of results while continue working hard to improve our services in the hope of obtaining even better scores in next year’s survey.” 

END 

Notes to editors: 

The CQC’s Community Mental Health Survey summarises the experiences of 12,139 respondents who received mental health care in the community between September and November 2016. 

Responses were received from 223 people at Humber NHS Foundation Trust and were identified as performing ‘better than expected’ compared to other trusts in the survey. 

The Trust scored 9.0/10 for organising care, including the following patient response scores:

  • 8.5/10 – Being informed: for having been told who is in charge of organising their care and services. This is better when compared to other trusts;
  • 9.9/10 – Contact: for those told who is in charge of organising their care, being able to contact this person if concerned about their care. This is better when compared to other trusts;
  • 8.5/10 – Organisation: for those told who is in charge of organising their care, that this person organises the care and services they need well. This is about the same when compared to other trusts.

The trust scored 8.1/10 for reviewing care, including the following patient response scores:

  • 7.8/10 – Care review: for having had a formal meeting with someone from NHS mental health services to discuss how their care is working in the last 12 months. This is about the same when compared to other trusts;
  • 8.2/10 – Involvement in care review: for those who had a formal meeting to discuss how their care is working, being involved as much as they wanted to be in this discussion. This is better when compared to other trusts;
  • 8.2/10 – Shared decisions: for those who had a formal meeting to discuss how their care is working, feeling that decisions were made together by them and the person seen. This is better when compared to other trusts. 

The trust scored 7.5/10 for treatments, including the following response scores:

    • 6.9/10 – Involvement in decisions: for those receiving medicines, being involved as much as they wanted in decisions about medicines received. This is about the same when compared to other trusts;
    • 6.6/10 – Understandable information: for those prescribed new medicines, being given information about it in a way that they could understand. This is about the same when compared to other trusts;
    • 8.2/10 – Medicine review: for those receiving medicines for 12 months or longer, that a mental health worker checked how they were getting on with their medicines. This is about the same when compared to other trusts;
  • 8.3/10 – Explanations: for those who received treatments or therapies other than medicine, that the treatments or therapies were explained to them in a way they could understand. This is about the same when compared to other trusts. 

7.5/10 – Involvement in deciding other treatment or therapies; for those who received treatments or therapies other than medicine, being involved as much as they wanted in deciding what treatments or therapies to use. This is about the same when compared to other trusts. 

END